Grapsus tenuicrustatus
Metopograpsus thukuhar
Macromedaeus crassimanus
Panopeus lacustris
Leptodius sanguineus
Pilodius areolatus
Plagusia tuberculata
(2 views)
Thalamita danae
Percnon planissimum
Polydectus cupulifer
Petrolisthes coccineus
Calappa gallus
Platypodia eydouxii
(2 views)
Unidentified Majidae
Calcinus elegans

Research Interests

European Green Crab found at Elkhorn Slough, CA

Introduced aquatic species—those moved into new areas purposely or inadvertently by human activity—have been long overlooked by both the public and the scientific community.

Several of these species, notably the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, and the water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, have made headlines recently because of the extensive damage they have done by clogging water intake pipes and choking waterways. These two species illustrate one of the potential problems of introduced species: freed from their native predators and competitors, these organisms can reproduce without check and by their sheer numbers alter the environment in which they find themselves.

Anthropogenic introductions have moved more organisms farther in a shorter amount of time than any natural process imaginable. Because of this, the study of invasions has potential to contribute to general ecological theory, serving as a “natural experiment” to test hypothesis about competition, predator-prey relationships, mutualisms, population dynamics, gene flow, and evolution. Invaders that interact with natives can provide an opportunity to test a number of ideas (recent examples include: evolutionary response of a prey species to introduced predator, Townsend, 1996; population depression of a native species as a result of resource competition with a superior invader, Daehler & Strong, 1996; changes in prey community structure as the result of an invasive predator, Grosholz & Ruiz, 1996).

Introduced aquatic species—those moved into new areas purposely or inadvertently by human activity—have been long overlooked by both the public and the scientific community.

FRONT CURRENT RESEARCHPERSONAL STATEMENTCV
Hawai`i Intertidal Project
zabinc@si.edu